$2.75

Out of Stock
Waiting on organic certification paperwork, should be available by 12/15/17 (H. argophyllus) 75 days. 6-15 ft. sprawling plants have silvery green foliage, many branches, and 2-4 in. bright yellow flowers with 3/4 – 1½ in. centers. Highly attractive to pollinators and birds. Rare species native to the Gulf coast and southern Texas. Crosses with common sunflowers. If planted early, the plants can get up to 15 ft. tall, with the stalks bending to keep their balance. Late in the season tall plants may shed their lower leaves, so some gardeners will plant these with another plant like zinnias in front to block the peculiar looking lower bare stems. Pkt (0.5 grams).
  • Item # 05701

Sunflowers

Helianthus annuus
How to grow: Annual. Germination: 14 days, 70 degrees F. Full sun. Direct sow in May or June. Space 12-18" apart. Taller varieties may need staking. Early in the growth stage, place a pole at the base of the stalk. As the stem grows, use twine or soft ties to secure it to the stake every 6' or so. History: Some archaeologists believe that Native Americans may have cultivated sunflowers as early as 3000 B.C. Uses: You can leave any remaining seed-heads in the garden for fall and winter visitors. Or you can cut and dry the seed-heads indoors. Throughout the winter months, tie dried heads to trees or to your deck to create feeding stations.Uses: You can leave any remaining seed-heads in the garden for fall and winter visitors. Or you can cut and dry the seed-heads indoors. Throughout the winter months, tie dried heads to fences or to your deck or suspend in trees to feed birds.