Tomorrow! A Citizen’s Assembly of Support in New York City

We’re on our way to the hearing in New York City, to support our lawyer in the lawsuit OSGATA et al. v. Monsanto. The lawsuit asks for protection for organic farmers whose crops have been contaminated by GE crops. Southern Exposure is a member of OSGATA, the Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association, the chief plaintiff in the case.

If you’re in the New York City area, we encourage you to come out tomorrow, Tuesday, January 31st, for the Citizens’ Assembly of Support.

RSVP to attend the Citizen’s Assembly >>

Sign Our Petition Supporting Farmers >>

When: Tuesday, January 31, 2012 @ 9:00 am

Where: Please gather respectfully at Pearl Street and Cardinal Hayes Place (45 Cardinal Hayes Place, New York, NY).  Link to Google Map >>

Join us in NYC on 31st in Court against Monsanto!

Whether in person or in spirit, we hope you’ll join us on Jan 31st as we gather at the Manhattan District Court with our 82 co-plaintiffs in our suit against Monsanto, OSGATA et al. vs Monsanto.  Monsanto has filed a motion to dismiss, claiming that the dangers that their genetically modified crops pose to our seed, our farms, and our livelihood aren’t even worth consideration by the courts.  The judge hearing our case has agreed to hear oral arguments for and against this motion to dismiss on January 31st.  We’re heading to NYC along with as many of our co-plaintiffs who can make it to show the judge who we are, that we care, and that the matter of this case is important to us.  We hope that if you’re in the area you’ll come out too to other supporters of a just, democratic, and healthy food system in a vigil outside the courthouse while the oral arguments are heard inside.  See the details here:

A Citizen’s Assembly in support of Family Farmers vs Monsanto!

What to Sow in January

As the year begins we’re eager to start sowing seeds, but nervous about starting too early and having big, leggy transplants and nowhere to plant them. There are lots of crops we can and should start in January: bulbing onions, rhubarb, artichokes, celery and celeriac, parsley, and spring flowers (like poppies, chamomile, and evening primrose). Long season hot peppers (like habañero) can be started at the end of January; peppers are generally slow to germinate. We’ll start our seeds indoors, or outside in cold frames or the hoophouse, for transplanting later in the spring.

Be aware of when you want to plant and decide when to sow transplants by counting back from then! Overly large transplants suffer greater transplant shock and may have reduced yields. Brassicas like kale, collards, cabbage, and broccoli should have 3-4 true leaves and be about six weeks old when you transplant. Tomatoes and eggplants also need about six weeks, and peppers need 8-10 weeks. In our area we transplant most brassicas in mid-March, so we’ll wait until early February to sow. We provide recommended planting dates (PDF) >>

Sow bulbing onions for transplant now if you haven’t sown them already. Those in the lower South should have already sown Short Day Length bulbing onions, like Vidalia, last fall. In-between areas like us will have the best results growing Long to Intermediate Day Length bulbing onions, and starting them in December or January. Transplant out when they’re still thinner than a pencil! Read about growing bulbing onions >>

Artichokes and rhubarb should be sown in January and grown in cold frames to vernalize. They need the exposure to colder temperatures now to put on much growth later.

Winter has been warm all over the South: we’ve been sowing greens in cold frames and the hoophouse every couple weeks since fall. You can sow a variety of winter hardy greens (spinach, cress, mustard greens, arugula) throughout January. Remember, plants grow slowly in winter’s low light – even in warm greenhouses your starts may not put on much growth until the sun is stronger.

There’s still work to be done outside, even if it’s too early to be putting out plants. On nice days, prepare your beds if the weather is warm and dry enough. Then cover with mulch or row cover (prevent erosion on bare soil!) until you’re ready to plant. And don’t forget to look after your perennials – most fruit trees need pruning in winter, before they start to bud.

Request a free copy of our new catalog if you haven’t received one yet. We do expect to run out of some varieties, so order early while things are still in stock.

Happy winter gardening!